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Stop & Shop Store Adds Advanced Refrigeration Technology

April 28, 2011

One of Stop & Shop’s newest stores in West Hartford, Conn., installed advanced refrigeration technology that yields significant energy savings and uses much less refrigerant than traditional stores.

Stop & Shop logoIn fact, the 38,000-square-foot store is the company’s first GreenChill Gold-Level certified store. The grocer is using Hill Phoenix Second Nature technology for both its low and medium temperature display cases and walk-in coolers that are designed to keep refrigerated and frozen foods at optimum temperatures while using the latest technology to minimize environmental impact.

“The glycol-CO2 technology is the first application of this technology in the state and fits into our focus on sustainability,” said Cary Nix, manager of engineering for the New York/New England division of Stop & Shop

The medium-temperature system, which uses propylene glycol as a coolant, cuts the refrigerant charge by 50 percent compared to a standard DX system. Low-temperature display cases and walk-in freezers use carbon dioxide as a primary refrigerant through a direct-expansion cascade system.

"The glycol-carbon dioxide technology is the first application of this technology in the state and fits our focus on sustainability," said Cary Nix, manager of engineering for the New York/New England division of Stop & Shop, a division of Ahold USA. “Even though it has only been a few months, by using the Second Nature system with glycol, we’ve already seen a reduction in the HFC refrigerant charge. We’re using 1,100 pounds of refrigerant, compared to about 2,600 (58 percent savings) you would typically need for a store this size.”

The system replaces a significant amount of halogenated fluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants – believed to be a contributor to global warming -- with food grade propylene glycol. The store also replaced R404A with R407A, an HFC refrigerant with nearly half of the global warming potential of R404A, according to Hill Phoenix.